Author Archives: Joseph Miller

Servers with Nvidia’s Tesla P100 GPU will ship next year

Nvidia’s fastest GPU yet, the new Tesla P100, will be available in servers next year, the company said.

Dell, Hewlett Packard Enterprise, Cray and IBM will start taking orders for servers with the Tesla P100 in the fourth quarter of this year, Nvidia CEO Jen-Hsun Huang said during a keynote at the GPU Technology Conference in San Jose, California.

The servers will start shipping in the first quarter of next year, Huang said Tuesday.

The GPU will also ship to companies designing hyperscale servers in-house and then to outsourced manufacturing shops. It will be available for in-house “cloud servers” by the end of the year, Huang said.

Nvidia is targeting the GPUs at deep-learning systems, in which algorithms aid in the correlation and classification of data. These systems could help self-driving cars, robots and drones identify objects. The goal is to accelerate the learning time of such systems so the accuracy of results improves over time.

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PCWorld News

What’s in HPE’s persistent memory?

Memory and storage have been separate in computers for decades, but that’s changing.

Hewlett Packard Enterprise took a step toward merging the two with its new “persistent memory” announced this week. A persistent memory module combines 8GB of DRAM and 8GB of flash in a single module that fits in a standard server DIMM slot.

DRAM operates at high speed but it’s relatively expensive, and if a server shuts down unexpectedly any data in DRAM is lost. Flash is slower but it’s nonvolatile, meaning it retains data when the power source is removed.

HPE says its persistent memory modules, known as NVDIMMs, combine the speed of DRAM with the resilience of flash.

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MedStar Health’s network shut down by malware

A large healthcare provider in the Washington, D.C., area said it has resorted to paper transactions after malware crippled part of its network early Monday.

MedStar Health, a not-for-profit that runs 10 hospitals, said its clinical facilities were functioning and that it did not appear data had been compromised. The malware prevented “certain users from logging into our system.”

“MedStar acted quickly to prevent the virus from spreading throughout the organization,” it said in a statement posted on Facebook. “We are working with our IT and cybersecurity partners to fully assess and address the situation.”

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