Category Archives: computer repair

The 5 surprising things to know about smart glasses

The world’s largest long-haul airline wants both employees and customers using smart glasses.

Emirates Airlines, based in Dubai, revealed this week that the company sees smart glasses as a strategic initiative that should help them fend off discount airline rivals.

Airlines succeed when they can treat passengers with a personal touch and top-notch customer service. For example, flight attendants can call passengers by name, provide personalized meals (that are, say, vegetarian or kosher), give extra attention to nervous fliers, provide added service for loyalty-card members or keep an eye on passengers with a history of disruptiveness.

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Computerworld

Apple gives productivity booster shot to iPad Pro

Apple this week bolstered its claim that the iPad Pro can perform as a personal computer by announcing significant changes to iOS 11, the mobile operating system upgrade slated to ship this fall, analysts said today.

“They don’t need to convince anybody, not when you look at what iOS 11 will be delivering,” said Carolina Milanesi of Creative Strategies, when asked why Apple did not restate its “iPad is a computer” message from the stage of the Worldwide Developers Conference (WWDC) Monday. Milanesi ticked off examples of the upcoming iOS 11 features she sees as helpful in improving the iPad Pro’s position as a computer: “[The] Files [app], drag-and-drop, multiple windows…and there’s a lot more there from a usability standpoint that makes you believe you can do this.”

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Computerworld

Apple’s WWDC 2017 announcements: First thoughts for the enterprise

Apple at WWDC 2017 made a wealth of announcements, many of which are likely of interest to enterprise users, these spanned iPads, iOS 11, AI, payments and, of course, Augmented Reality (AR).

What follows is a short first stop look at some of the news enterprise users may find interesting. I’ll provide more depth later this week.

The big opportunity: ARKit

While at face value you might see ARKit as being similar to Facebook’s Camera Effects, you’d be missing something.

Not only has Apple done years of groundwork to make sure these tools will work on tens of millions of devices, but its users are happy to cough up cash to engage in these experiences.

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Computerworld

Google, A.I. and the rise of the super-sensor

Google dazzled developers this week with a new feature called Google Lens.

Appearing first in Google Assistant and Google Photos, Google Lens uses artificial intelligence (A.I.) to specifically identify things in the frame of a smartphone camera.

In Google’s demo, not only did Google Lens identify a flower, but the species of flower. The demo also showed the automatic login to a wireless router when Google Lens was pointed at the router barcodes. And finally, Google Lens was shown identifying businesses by sight, popping up Google Maps cards for each establishment.

Google Lens is shiny and fun. But from the resulting media commentary, it was clear that the real implications were generally lost.

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Computerworld

Apple simplifies Windows 10 installs with support for Creators Update

Apple this week updated macOS Sierra to version 10.12.5 with more than three dozen security patches, and a change that lets users install Microsoft’s latest version of Windows 10 on their Macs.

Sierra 10.12.5 “adds support for media-free installation of Windows 10 Creators Update using Boot Camp,” the update’s brief release notes read. Creators Update was the name Microsoft assigned to Windows 10 1703, the upgrade issued last month.

Boot Camp, which is baked into macOS, lets Mac owners run Windows on their machines. A Windows license is required. Boot Camp, while not virtualization software like VMware’s Fusion or Parallels International’s Parallels Desktop, serves the same purpose: Running Windows applications, including custom or mission-critical corporate software, on a Mac personal computer.

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Computerworld