For new Pokémon Go characters, it’s Pokémon Wait

People who are hoping to get their hands on some new Pokémon should be prepared to wait a while longer. John Hanke, the CEO of Niantic Labs, told an audience at TechCrunch Disrupt that players should expect to see new creatures arrive in the game at events that bring players together, but only after the company has finished its long global rollout.

“The introduction of new Pokémon into the world, and having events where that might be showcased, those concepts go together really well,” he said. “So, I think you can expect to see that happen in kind of a synchronized way going forward.” 

It’s a move from the playbook that Niantic has developed running Ingress, the augmented reality game that it launched prior to Pokémon Go while it was a part of Google. Over the past several years, Niantic has hosted events for players of that game, which often host thousands of players. 

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

PCWorld News

Crafty malware is found targeting U.S. government employees

A tough-to-detect malware that attacks government and corporate computers has been upgraded, making it more aggressive in its mission to steal sensitive files, according to security firm InfoArmor.

Last November, InfoArmor published details on GovRAT, a sophisticated piece of malware that’s designed to bypass antivirus tools. It does this by using stolen digital certificates to avoid detection.

Through GovRAT, hackers can potentially steal files from a victim’s computer, remotely execute commands, or upload other malware to the system.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

PCWorld News

Scientists look at how A.I. will change our lives by 2030

By the year 2030, artificial intelligence (A.I.) will have changed the way we travel to work and to parties, how we take care of our health and how our kids are educated.

That’s the consensus from a panel of academic and technology experts taking part in Stanford University’s One Hundred Year Study on Artificial Intelligence.

Focused on trying to foresee the advances coming to A.I., as well as the ethical challenges they’ll bring, the panel yesterday released its first study.

The 28,000-word report, “Artificial Intelligence and Life in 2030,” looks at eight categories — from employment to healthcare, security, entertainment, education, service robots, transportation and poor communities — and tries to predict how smart technologies will affect urban life.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Computerworld

Ford, MIT use Bostonians’ cellphone location data for traffic planning

By collecting the anonymous cellphone location data from nearly two million Bostonians, MIT and Ford were able to produce near-instant urban mobility patterns that typically cost millions of dollars and take years to build.

The big data experiment holds the promise of more accurate and timely data about urban mobility patterns that can be used to quickly determine whether particular attempts to address local transportation needs are working.

In making decisions about infrastructure development and resource allocation, city planners rely on models of how people move through their cities — on foot, in cars and by public transportation. Those models are largely based on socio-demographic information from costly, time-consuming manual surveys, which are in small sample sizes and infrequently updated. Cities might go more than a decade between surveys.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Computerworld