This week in games: Revolver steering wheels and a game built around RTFM

I was hoping for more news out of Tokyo Game Show this week but apparently it’s not to be. Other than the last-minute delay of The Last Guardian (again) and a mediocre Watch Dogs 2 trailer (below), things have been quiet out of Japan.

But hey, Zachtronics is bringing out a spiritual successor to TIS-100, American Truck Simulator is selling custom steering wheels, Ken Levine gave a great interview on BioShock’s nude dude, and Mafia III put out an amazing PC specification requirements poster. Seriously.

This is gaming news for September 12 through 16.

Freebies

In addition to all Battlefield 4’s DLC being given away for free this weekend, it’s also time for Ubisoft’s next Anniversary game. This time out it’s The Crew, Ubisoft’s mediocre-ish open-world racer. Not quite the same caliber as last month’s giveaway, Rayman Origins, but hey—still free. As always, you’ll need Uplay to take advantage.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

PCWorld News

For new Pokémon Go characters, it’s Pokémon Wait

People who are hoping to get their hands on some new Pokémon should be prepared to wait a while longer. John Hanke, the CEO of Niantic Labs, told an audience at TechCrunch Disrupt that players should expect to see new creatures arrive in the game at events that bring players together, but only after the company has finished its long global rollout.

“The introduction of new Pokémon into the world, and having events where that might be showcased, those concepts go together really well,” he said. “So, I think you can expect to see that happen in kind of a synchronized way going forward.” 

It’s a move from the playbook that Niantic has developed running Ingress, the augmented reality game that it launched prior to Pokémon Go while it was a part of Google. Over the past several years, Niantic has hosted events for players of that game, which often host thousands of players. 

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

PCWorld News

Crafty malware is found targeting U.S. government employees

A tough-to-detect malware that attacks government and corporate computers has been upgraded, making it more aggressive in its mission to steal sensitive files, according to security firm InfoArmor.

Last November, InfoArmor published details on GovRAT, a sophisticated piece of malware that’s designed to bypass antivirus tools. It does this by using stolen digital certificates to avoid detection.

Through GovRAT, hackers can potentially steal files from a victim’s computer, remotely execute commands, or upload other malware to the system.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

PCWorld News

Scientists look at how A.I. will change our lives by 2030

By the year 2030, artificial intelligence (A.I.) will have changed the way we travel to work and to parties, how we take care of our health and how our kids are educated.

That’s the consensus from a panel of academic and technology experts taking part in Stanford University’s One Hundred Year Study on Artificial Intelligence.

Focused on trying to foresee the advances coming to A.I., as well as the ethical challenges they’ll bring, the panel yesterday released its first study.

The 28,000-word report, “Artificial Intelligence and Life in 2030,” looks at eight categories — from employment to healthcare, security, entertainment, education, service robots, transportation and poor communities — and tries to predict how smart technologies will affect urban life.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Computerworld