MedStar Health’s network shut down by malware

A large healthcare provider in the Washington, D.C., area said it has resorted to paper transactions after malware crippled part of its network early Monday.

MedStar Health, a not-for-profit that runs 10 hospitals, said its clinical facilities were functioning and that it did not appear data had been compromised. The malware prevented “certain users from logging into our system.”

“MedStar acted quickly to prevent the virus from spreading throughout the organization,” it said in a statement posted on Facebook. “We are working with our IT and cybersecurity partners to fully assess and address the situation.”

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Computerworld

Researchers break Apple’s iMessage encryption, will be fixed in iOS 9.3

The way the FBI tells it, the encryption on Apple’s iOS is so secure, nothing can break it. Well, not so fast. As reported by the Washington Post, researchers at Johns Hopkins University say they’ve found a bug that allows them to break the encryption of iMessages, decoding photos and videos.

The method requires the data to be in transit, not stored, so it wouldn’t actually help in the case of the San Bernardino shooter’s locked iPhone. By writing software to mimic an Apple server, researchers were able to intercept an encrypted transmission that contained a link to a photo on an iCloud server, as well as a 64-digit key that decrypts it. The key wasn’t visible, but the researchers were able to brute-force each digit. The team notified Apple, who says it paritally fixed the flaw in iOS 9, and will release the full fix on Monday in iOS 9.3.

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PCWorld News

Your old dog may already know this Digiwell NFC trick

Patrick Kramer pulled back his sleeves and reached out an empty hand to offer his business card.

His contact details appeared on the smartphone screen as if by magic, but it was a sufficiently advanced technology that made it happen.

For an encore, he opened a locked door without a key. When anyone else touched the handle, it remained locked.

Unlike other magicians, Kramer willingly explained the secret to the trick, which is so simple a dog could perform it: In the flesh between his left thumb and forefinger, he has inserted a tiny glass bead containing an NFC chip.

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Computerworld